Curcuma ecalcarata – new natural source of pinocembrin and piperitenoneby K.B. Rameshkumar, D.B. Alan Sheeja, Mangalam S. Nair, V. George

Natural Product Research

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Year
2015
DOI
10.1080/14786419.2014.994210
Subject
Plant Science / Organic Chemistry / Analytical Chemistry / Biochemistry

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Curcuma ecalcarata – new natural source of pinocembrin and piperitenone

K.B. Rameshkumara, D.B. Alan Sheejab, Mangalam S. Nairb & V.

Georgec a Phytochemistry and Phytopharmacology Division, Jawaharlal

Nehru Tropical Botanic Garden and Research Institute, Palode,

Thiruvananthapuram 695 562, Kerala, India b Organic Chemistry Section, CSIR–National Institute for

Interdisciplinary Science and Technology, Thiruvananthapuram 695 019, Kerala, India c Amity Institute for Herbal and Biotech Products Development,

Peroorkada, Thiruvananthapuram 695 005, Kerala, India

Published online: 02 Jan 2015.

To cite this article: K.B. Rameshkumar, D.B. Alan Sheeja, Mangalam S. Nair & V. George (2015):

Curcuma ecalcarata – new natural source of pinocembrin and piperitenone, Natural Product

Research: Formerly Natural Product Letters, DOI: 10.1080/14786419.2014.994210

To link to this article: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/14786419.2014.994210

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D ow nl oa de d by [C hu lal on gk or n U niv ers ity ] a t 1 7:0 0 1 1 J an ua ry 20 15

SHORT COMMUNICATION

Curcuma ecalcarata – new natural source of pinocembrin and piperitenone

K.B. Rameshkumara*, D.B. Alan Sheejab, Mangalam S. Nairb and V. Georgec aPhytochemistry and Phytopharmacology Division, Jawaharlal Nehru Tropical Botanic Garden and

Research Institute, Palode, Thiruvananthapuram 695 562, Kerala, India; bOrganic Chemistry Section,

CSIR–National Institute for Interdisciplinary Science and Technology, Thiruvananthapuram 695 019,

Kerala, India; cAmity Institute for Herbal and Biotech Products Development, Peroorkada,

Thiruvananthapuram 695 005, Kerala, India (Received 27 June 2014; final version received 25 November 2014)

Phytochemical analysis of the rhizome extract of Curcuma ecalcarata, a hitherto uninvestigated south Western Ghats endemic species, resulted in the isolation and identification of the diaryl heptanoid trans, trans-1,7-diphenyl-5-hydroxy-4,6heptadiene-3-one (1), steroid b-sitosterol (2), flavanone pinocembrin (4) and monoterpenoids piperitenone (3) and 8-hydroxy piperitone (5). HPTLC estimation of pinocembrin in the rhizome revealed the plant as a rich source of pinocembrin (0.37% dry wt.). The rhizome essential oil was isolated by hydrodistillation and analysed by

GC–FID, GC–MS and 13C NMR. Among the 30 constituents identified in the oil, monoterpenoids predominated (94.2%) followed by sesquiterpenoids (5.8%). The major compound consisting of 65.2% of the oil was isolated and identified as piperitenone (3). The study highlights the plant as a rich source of the flavanone pinocembrin and the volatile aroma compound piperitenone.

Keywords: Curcuma ecalcarata; pinocembrin; HPTLC; essential oil; piperitenone;

GC–MS 1. Introduction

Genus Curcuma (Family: Zingiberaceae) of rhizomatous herbs is widely distributed in the tropics of Asia and extends to Africa and Australia. The genus is represented by about 120 species of which 42 species occur in India (Sabu 2006). Rhizomes of plants belonging to the genus Curcuma are used as spices, cosmetics and traditional folk medicines in many parts of the world. A number of Curcuma species such as Curcuma longa, Curcuma amada, Curcuma q 2015 Taylor & Francis *Corresponding author. Email: kbrtbgri@gmail.com

Natural Product Research, 2015 http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/14786419.2014.994210

D ow nl oa de d by [C hu lal on gk or n U niv ers ity ] a t 1 7:0 0 1 1 J an ua ry 20 15 zedoaria, Curcuma purpurascens, Curcuma heyneana, Curcuma xanthorrhiza, Curcuma aeruginosa, Curcuma phaeocaulis and Curcuma petiolata are cultivated in different regions of

India for various uses such as colouring agents, cosmetics, source of starch and folk medicines.

Furthermore, there exists a number of wild Curcuma species in India (Sabu 2006).

The genus Curcuma is a source of important phytochemicals and both the extracts and essential oils have been studied for their phytochemicals. The chemical investigations of

Curcuma species have resulted in the isolation and identification of a large number of compounds belonging to diarylheptanoids, diarylpentanoids, monoterpenoids, sesquiterpenoids, diterpenoids, triterpenoids, alkaloids and steroids (Nahar & Sarker 2007; Li et al. 2011).

Essential oils of Curcuma species have extensively been studied, resulting in the identification of several volatile chemicals, of which sesquiterpenoids predominated (Yang et al. 2007; Li et al. 2011).