Antioxidant properties, phenolic composition and potentiometric sensor array evaluation of commercial and new blueberry (Vaccinium corymbosum) and bog blueberry (Vaccinium uliginosum) genotypesby Vilma Kraujalytė, Petras Rimantas Venskutonis, Audrius Pukalskas, Laima Česonienė, Remigijus Daubaras

Food Chemistry

About

Year
2015
DOI
10.1016/j.foodchem.2015.05.031
Subject
Analytical Chemistry / Food Science

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Accepted Manuscript

Antioxidant properties, phenolic composition and potentiometric sensor array evaluation of commercial and new blueberry (Vaccinium corymbosum) and bog blueberry (Vaccinium uliginosum) genotypes

Vilma Kraujalytė, Petras Rimantas Venskutonis, Audrius Pukalskas, Laima Česonienė, Remigijus Daubaras

PII: S0308-8146(15)00762-1

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.foodchem.2015.05.031

Reference: FOCH 17577

To appear in: Food Chemistry

Received Date: 8 January 2015

Revised Date: 4 May 2015

Accepted Date: 7 May 2015

Please cite this article as: Kraujalytė, V., Venskutonis, P.R., Pukalskas, A., Česonienė, L., Daubaras, R., Antioxidant properties, phenolic composition and potentiometric sensor array evaluation of commercial and new blueberry (Vaccinium corymbosum) and bog blueberry (Vaccinium uliginosum) genotypes, Food Chemistry (2015), doi: http:// dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.foodchem.2015.05.031

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Antioxidant properties, phenolic composition and potentiometric sensor array evaluation of commercial and new blueberry (Vaccinium corymbosum) and bog blueberry (Vaccinium uliginosum) genotypes

Vilma Kraujalytėa, Petras Rimantas Venskutonisa, Audrius Pukalskasa, Laima Česonienėb,

Remigijus Daubarasb a Department of Food Science and Technology, Kaunas University of Technology, Radvilėnų pl. 19,

Kaunas, LT-50254, Lithuania b

Kaunas Botanical Garden of Vytautas Magnus University, Žilibero g. 6, Kaunas LT-46324,

Lithuania *Corresponding author: Tel.: +370 37 300188; fax: +370 37 456647

E-mail address: rimas.venskutonis@ktu.lt (Petras Rimantas Venskutonis)

Running title: Antioxidant potential and polyphenolics of 19 blueberry genotypes

Abstract

Antioxidant properties of juices of newly bred and known blueberry (Vaccinium corymbosum) genotypes and wild bog blueberry (Vaccinium uliginosum) were evaluated by ABTS·+ scavenging capacity (RSC), ferric reducing antioxidant power (FRAP), oxygen radical absorbance capacity (ORAC), total phenolic content (TPC) and total anthocyanin content (TAC) assays. TPC varied in the range of 0.85–2.81 mg gallic acid equivalents/mL, RSC, FRAP and ORAC values were 6.38– 20.9, 3.07–17.8 and 4.21–45.68 µmol trolox equivalents/g, respectively. New blueberry genotypes and bog blueberry demonstrated stronger antioxidant properties and TAC than other studied genotypes. The content of quinic (203–3614 µg/mL), chlorogenic (20.0–346.8 µg/mL) acids and rutin (0.00–26.88 µg/mL) measured by UPLC/ESI-QTOF-MS varied depending on the genotype.

Juices were evaluated by electronic tongue; PCA score plot showed that the method discriminates different genotypes although some juice samples were located very closely and overlapping.

Significant differences were observed between L*, a*, b* colour parameters of some genotypes.

Keywords: Vaccinium corymbosum; Vaccinium uliginosum; antioxidant capacity; phenolic compounds; total anthocyanin content; electronic tongue; colour. 1. Introduction

Berries of Vaccinium spp. have gained a remarkable worldwide interest due to their excellent sensory properties and the presence of healthy constituents (Scalzo, Stevenson, & Hedderley, 2013).

Blueberries (V. corymbosum) and some closely related species are among the most popular berries.

Continuous breeding programs were focusing on higher commercial value genotypes with high productivity, large berry size, firmness, disease resistance, etc. Large fruits, waxy coating, light blue colour, firmness and a long shelf life are among the most important berry characteristics. However, due to an increasing demand of healthy foods breeding programs of new cultivars with higher concentrations of bioactive compounds are continued in many horticultural units worldwide. For instance, antioxidants have become a desirable quality characteristic of berries due to their antiinflammatory effects. Therefore, phenolics possessing radical scavenging capacity are among the predictors for selecting new blueberry cultivars. It is well documented that blueberries are rich in phenolics, particularly hydroxycinnamic and hydroxybenzoic acids and their derivatives such as chlorogenic, caffeic, gallic, p-coumaric, ferulic, ellagic, syringic, vanillic acids (Häkkinen &

Törrönen, 2000; Mattila, Hellström, & Törrönen, 2006; Rodriguez-Mateos, Cifuentes-Gomez,

Tabatabaee, Lecras, & Spencer, 2012). Blueberries also accumulate flavonols (mainly quercetin derivatives), anthocyanins, flavan-3-ols, and proanthocyanidins (Häkkinen & Törrönen, 2000; Cho,

Howard, Prior, & Clark, 2004; Brownmiller, Howard, & Prior, 2009; Wang, Chen, Sciarappa,

Wang, & Camp, 2008). Blueberry phenolics were reported as constituents, which are responsible for their high radical scavenging capacity (Wang et. al., 2008; Giovanelli & Buratti, 2009).

Sensory properties of berries, which traditionally are evaluated by a panel of trained experts is also very important factor determining consumer preferences. In addition, instrumental methods and their combination with organoleptic assessment for the characterisation of flavour properties have been rapidly developing in the past decades. For instance, identification of the key-odour compounds currently is performed mainly by a combination of gas chromatography and olfactometry. Although simultaneous application of these techniques provides valuable information they are time-consuming and expensive. Therefore alternative rapid methods in a reliable and costeffective manner are of a great practical interest, electronic tongues being good examples of such techniques (Escuder-Gilaberta & Peris, 2010 and references herein). Electronic tongue is an analytical system applied for the analysis of liquid multicomponent samples based on an array of sensors coupled with chemometric processing tool and is considered as an instrument artificially reproducing taste sensation. It was widely tested for liquid foodstuffs, including water (Sipos et al., 2012), soft drinks (Diasa, Peresa, Barcelosa, Sá Moraisa, & Machado, 2011) and was proven as a promising, rapid and low-cost method.